Dating abbreviation

19-Nov-2016 18:11 by 2 Comments

Dating abbreviation - Chat sexy girle camera roulite live

Counting was done in scores (a score = 20), so you will often come across something like this: xx iiij ( 20 over 4), which means 4 times 20, or four score, which is 80.Compare this with the modern French word for 80 - quatre-vingts, ‘four twenties’.

The Calendar Act 1752 brought about further changes.Ordinal numbers are represented by superscript letters following them, just as today. Top of page Money was calculated in pounds, shillings and pence. The pound was represented either by ‘li’, or £: transcribe both with a £ sign before the amount given. It was worth two-thirds of a pound, that is 13s 4d.This symbol is actually an elaborate ‘L’, from the Latin ‘libra’, meaning pound. Half a mark (one-third of a pound) was therefore 6s 8d.Thus the year number did not change until 25 March, so taking 1558 as an example, the dates ran as follows: So if you see a document dated any time between January and 24 March before 1752, be aware that in modern terms, you need to add a year.In publications you may see this written as January 1750/51, the year as it was known at the time / the year as we know it now.In 1582 Pope Gregory XIII had reformed the calendar, then in use, known as the Julian Calendar (named after Julius Caesar).

The Julian Calendar did not correspond exactly to the solar year.The stamp initially had three dots and for each quarter one dot was filed down leaving none for the fourth quarter. Since production was overlapping examples exist with either the imprint 28 or .8. Also, since this coding system extended over a decade, a pen marked 38 could be produced the third quarter either in 1938 or 1948. Most people today are still familiar with the classic Roman numerals.Be aware, however, that you will find them represented in a slightly different way in documents written in English. A ‘1’ by itself, or at the end of a number, was usually represented by a ‘j’.‘1 Elizabeth I’ means the first year of the reign of Elizabeth I.